Authors & Speakers

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

It can be quite difficult and very frustrating to live with a person going through a LateLife crisis/transition. Some days he or she may act like an adolescent, with outbursts of anger, deep depression, or withdrawal, while other times they are the picture of stability. They may not like who they are, they don’t know who they want to be, they are uncomfortable with their status and confused about where they are going and what they are doing to get there. Their values, and maybe even their morals, are quite confused.
Sailboat in storm
At LateLife people might change their external lifestyles such as clothes, car, and exercise routines. They also reassess work and career as burn-out may be happening with their current job, but they know they can’t afford to retire as they had hoped. Additionally they ask emotional and spiritual questions such as, "Who Am I?", "Can and old dog really learn new tricks?", "With whom should I spend my time?", "How does God fit into my life?", and "Has my life had enough meaning to leave a legacy?"

The person is now like a sailboat caught in a deep fog offshore, without a compass and without wind to move in any direction. The person wants help with their insecurity, doubt, and weakness, however they may reject any type of help from their mate. Their strange personality fluctuations may be frustrating to live with, but remember, it’s for a short season of life. Stay positive and focused on your own growth. Remember to give lots of positive, true affirmation, in whatever form your mate likes to receive it; verbally in private or in front of others, in a card, possibly a text, maybe over a nice dinner.

Change is inevitable, and ok. Go with the flow and accept change as a spontaneous new way of life.

 


by Jim Conway, Ph.D.  ©2012

It can be quite difficult and very frustrating to live with a person going through a LateLife crisis/transition. Some days he or she may act like an adolescent, with outbursts of anger, deep depression, or withdrawal, while other times they are the picture of stability. They may not like who they are, they don’t know who they want to be, they are uncomfortable with their status and confused about where they are going and what they are doing to get there. Their values, and maybe even their morals, are quite confused.

 

At LateLife people might change their external lifestyles such as clothes, car, and exercise routines. They also reassess work and career as burn-out may be happening with their current job, but they know they can’t afford to retire as they had hoped. Additionally they ask emotional and spiritual questions such as, "Who Am I?", "Can and old dog really learn new tricks?", "With whom should I spend my time?", "How does God fit into my life?", and "Has my life had enough meaning to leave a legacy?"

 

The person is now like a sailboat caught in a deep fog offshore, without a compass and without wind to move in any direction. The person wants help with their insecurity, doubt, and weakness, however they may reject any type of help from their mate. Their strange personality fluctuations may be frustrating to live with, but remember, it’s for a short season of life. Stay positive and focused on your own growth. Remember to give lots of positive, true affirmation, in whatever form your mate likes to receive it; verbally in private or in front of others, in a card, possibly a text, maybe over a nice dinner.

 

Change is inevitable, and ok. Go with the flow and accept change as a spontaneous new way of life.

 

Amazon Gift Cards - Support LLH

Shop for Kindle and Support LLH

Shop Amazon and Support LLH